Paste your Google Webmaster Tools verification code here

Domestic Violence/Intimate Partner Violence Sexual Assault Report Violence

STAND in PRIDE Blog Community Education and Workshops Resources

You have a right to be safe, and feel supported and loved.  Does your safety feel threatened emotionally, physically, or sexually? Support is available!

24-Hour Confidential Crisis Lines

Domestic/Intimate Partner Violence:
STAND! for Families
Free of Violence
888.215.5555 (Español available)
Sexual Assault:
Community Violence Solutions
800.670.7273
(accessible from 925, 510, 415,
408, 707 and 650 area codes)
Suicide and Crisis Intervention:
Contra Costa Crisis Center
800.273.TALK
800.273.8255
(en Español)

Looking to make a free call for help and other resources?
Dial 211 from any pay phone (and most other phones) in  Contra Costa County to reach the Contra Costa Crisis Center

sip_blog2

Welcome to the new STAND in PRIDE Blog!

Find updated information about the STAND in PRIDE project including current events, articles, news, information, videos and more!

This blog is dedicated to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) domestic violence/intimate partner violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, and hate crimes. Many times we are told our community does not experience these forms of violence. We know this not to be true, and it’s important to let the world hear our voice. Media is one of the ways we can begin to raise awareness on these dire issues. Please spread the word about this blog!

Questions? Comments? Concerns? Want to make a submission?

E-mail: ryan@rainbowcc.org

279233_10150239102565927_7948956_o

Ryan Beaver

——————————————————

STAND in Pride No Longer Providing Services

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Due to changes in funding, STAND in Pride is no longer active and is not providing services at this time.  Counseling and Case Management is available through Rainbow Counseling Services at the Rainbow Community Center.  For more information, please visit http://rainbowcc.org/program/rainbow-counseling-services/ or call RCC’s confidential intake line at 925.692.2056.

Other Resources:
Community Violence Solutions’ 24-Hour Confidential Crisis Line 800.670.7273. (accessible from 925, 510, 415, 408, 707 and 650 area codes) or visit http://www.standffov.org/
STAND! for Families Free of Violence’s 24-Hour Confidential Crisis Line 1.888.215.5555 or visit http://www.cvsolutions.org/

Please visit our resource page for further options.

——————————————————

LGBTQ & POZ Intimate Partner Violence Report

Friday, January 15, 2016

2014 REPORT ON LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER, QUEER, AND HIV-AFFECTED INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

On October 27, 2015, the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs “released its report Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Intimate Partner Violence in 2014. For this report – the most comprehensive of its kind – NCAVP collected data concerning intimate partner violence (IPV) within LGBTQ and HIV-affected relationships from 16 anti-violence programs in 13 states across the country.”

Check out the powerful infographic below summarizing the findings of the report.

Learn more in their Official Media Release: http://www.avp.org/storage/documents/2014_IPV_Report_Media_Release_Final.pdf

Or review the full text of the report here: http://www.avp.org/storage/documents/2014_IPV_Report_Final_w-Bookmarks_10_28.pdf

 

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Preventing Discriminatory Policing of Domestic and Sexual Violence

Thursday, December 16, 2015

New guidelines ask law enforcement officials to examine how they respond to domestic violence and sexual assault against LGBT survivors

Check out this ACLU article covering a presentation yesterday by Attorney General Loretta Lynch on new national guidelines for police response to domestic violence and sexual violence. This new framework asks officers to be mindful of gender bias and heteronormative bias in how they respond to sexual assault and domestic violence, and thus prompts consideration of how to respond effectively to violence affecting women and LGBT individuals. The article notes that, “By highlighting the serious problem of gender and LGBT discrimination in policing, the attorney general declared that police misconduct in responding, and sometimes perpetrating, domestic and sexual violence is a civil rights issue.”

The guidance is tremendously significant for LGBT people who are too often met with indifference or worse when reporting instances of domestic and sexual violence to law enforcement.  It notes the alarming statistic that 61 percent of bisexual women have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner.  In addressing how to properly investigate sexual assault or domestic violence complaints thoroughly and effectively, the guidance provides an example of a transgender woman whose partner hits her several times when he learns that she is transgender.  In the example, the officers leave without taking a report, have sympathy for the man who feels “deceived,” and believe their efforts are better spent on more serious crimes.  The guidance makes clear that this response constitutes discriminatory policing.

Continue reading the article to learn about the eight principles set forth for responding to domestic violence and sexual assault free from discrimination: https://www.aclu.org/blog/speak-freely/8-principles-will-stop-police-practices-harm-women-and-lgbt-people

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Movie Screening!

Monday, November 16, 2015

Two Short films about Lesbian and Queer Relationships

On Wednesday December 9th 2015 STAND in Pride will host a movie screening of two short films created by members of the Queer Women of Color Media Arts Project in San Francisco. The films “The last time” by Vanessa Coe and “Triggered” by Arnetta Smith are films that introduce a common story of many lesbian and queer relationships that find themselves struggling with the impacts of unhealthy and even a violent relationships. These films will be hosted for people who have experienced unhealthy and violent relationships however, they are open to the whole community. Join us for the screening and a discussion facilitated by our STAND in Pride Staff. This enriching screening will provide light beverages and snacks.

QWOCMAP final flyer

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.
——————————————————

Celebrating #QTPOCLove with TOD@S

Thursday, October 29, 2015

A LGBTQ and POC Inclusive Public Awareness Campaign for Domestic Violence Awareness Month

This Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the TOD@S Collaborative is broadening our public understanding of what intimate partner violence is and who it impacts, while also depicting, promoting, and celebrating healthy relationships among queer and trans people of color.

And they’re doing all of this in six simple (and amazing!) ads. Learn more about this revolutionary ad campaign here!

TOD@S Collaborative is a collaboration between four Boston-based organizations including Hispanic Black Gay Coalition, The Network / La Red, Renewal House Shelter, and The Violence Recovery Program at Fenway Health. These agencies work together to offer prevention services and increase access to intervention for queer/transgender people of color affected by intimate partner violence. The name, which in Spanish translates to “everybody,” stands for Transforming Ourselves Through Dialogue, Organizing and Services. The @ symbol comes from the term Latin@, which is used to include both the feminine Latina and the masculine Latino identities.

Check out and support “Celebrating #QTPOCLove” by following the hashtag on facebook, twitter, and instagram!

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

A Personal Story of Overcoming Abuse

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Trigger Warning: The following article discusses a personal story of physical and emotional abuse in an LGBTQ relationship and may be triggering to people who have experienced violence.

In “At least she did not hit me,” the author, HOLAA, recounts a personal experience of coming through an abusive LGBTQ relationship.  HOLAA holds her perspective as both a survivor of LGBTQ intimate partner violence side by side with an outside perspective as a human right lawyer who has supported other women to leave abusive relationships.  As she recounts her experience, HOLAA asks important questions that draw attention to the lack of visibility and limited access to services for LGBTQ survivors of intimate partner violence, and deconstructs myths around gender and sexuality in the context of relationship abuse.  And importantly, she acknowledges the difficulty of leaving, stresses the need for self compassion, and offers critical advice to friends and supporters of people in abusive relationships on how they can offer meaningful support.

If you’re in an abusive relationship, I won’t tell you leave now because honey, everyone has told you to leave and trust me, if you wanted to leave you’d have left.

You will leave when you’re ready…

In the meantime, love and be gentle with yourself. Hang out with people who love you and do activities you enjoy. Develop a social life outside your relationship. Pray, if you believe in a god. Read books and watch movies about abuse survivors. Plan secretly how to leave so that you can safely leave and never return as soon as you’re ready.

Tell someone about the abuse.

If your friend is being abused, please do not ever demand that she leaves. It is not your place to issue ultimatums. Tell her that her partner’s actions are not acceptable and that she would be better off leaving her but don’t judge or pressure her. Support her, listen to her and comfort her. Don’t be frustrated when she breaks up only to return again.

It is all part of the process.

One day, she will make the right decision. Tell her about the options she has if she leaves including staying with you if possible.

Read the full article here: “At least she did not hit me” by HOLAA

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Secret Survivors Screening

Monday, August 10, 2015

Join us for a Movie Night for LGBTQ Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse

Final Secret Survivors Flyer

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

STAND in PRIDE Open House

Monday, August 10, 2015

Unveiling of Toolkit for Working with LGBTQ Survivors of Violence

Please Join us for our Open House and the unveiling of our Toolkit!

The Rainbow Community Center in partnership with STAND in PRIDE will provide workshops and an Open House for service providers and community members who support LGBTQ survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and hate-motivated violence.

There will be two workshops from 12:00pm-2:00pm. One workshop will discuss how to support survivors as a community member and the other will be for service providers.

Workshops from 12:00pm-2:00pm

Open House from 2:00pm-4:00pm

unnamed (1)

Drop by at 12:00pm or 2:00pm to learn more about STAND in PRIDE and receive a copy of our Toolkit!

Food will be Provided!

The Toolkit is a set of best practices for folks working with LGBTQ survivors of violence.

COME CELEBRATE WITH US!

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

The Untold Story of Domestic Violence

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Intimate Partner Violence in the LGBT Community

The Women’s Foundation of California recently published  “The Untold Story of Domestic Violence,” an article by Allie Ang discussing  LGBT intimate partner violence, barriers for LGBT survivors of violence to get the help they need, and noting that progress toward equity for all women must also address the needs of queer women. Check out the snippet below, and click through to read the full article and learn more about LGBT intimate partner violence.

Queer people often feel as though they must maintain the façade of a perfect relationship in order to ensure that the LGBT community has a good image. In a 2012 article titled “Domestic Violence in Same-Gender Relationships,” Dr. Joanna Bunker Rohrbaugh writes, “Many lesbian and gay victims do not tell anyone about the abuse because they feel that their relationship must appear ‘perfect’ to compensate for the stigma of being homosexual.” Read more: http://womensfoundationofcalifornia.org/the-untold-story-of-domestic-violence/

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

LGBTQ & POZ Hate Violence Report

Monday, June 15, 2015

2014 NATIONAL REPORT ON LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER, QUEER, AND HIV-AFFECTED HATE VIOLENCE

On June 9, 2015, the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs “released its annual report documenting the level of hate violence experienced by LGBTQ and HIV-affected persons in the United States in 2014. The report, Hate Violence Against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV Affected Communities in the United States in 2014, is the most comprehensive report on this violence in the United States.”

Check out the powerful infographic below summarizing the findings of the report.

Learn more in their Official Media Release: http://www.avp.org/storage/documents/Reports/MEDIARELEASE_2014_NCAVP_HVREPORT.pdf 

Or review the full text of the report here: http://www.avp.org/storage/documents/Reports/2014_HV_Report-Final.pdf

2014-HV-Infographics-Full-Page

 

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Justice within Oppressed Communities

Friday, May 15, 2015

Intersectional Justice: On Intimate Partner Violence in Queer Communities

Reina Gattuso is spending the month discussing intimate partner violence in queer communities on Feministing.com.  In the most recent post, “Intersectional Justice: On Intimate Partner Violence in Queer Communities,” Reina discusses the complex power dynamic at play between people of different identities in the context of intimate partner violence and larger systems of oppression.  She talks about the need for compassionate responses, community healing, accountability, and finding justice in the context of LGBTQ intimate partner violence.

Truly respecting each other’s agency as marginalized people means not only having compassion for our struggles, but holding each other accountable for the harm we cause. Accountability is an act of love. It is also an act of hope: We need to believe that experiences of oppression or violence do not dictate our futures. That we can choose to act in different ways.

Read the whole article here: http://feministing.com/2015/05/12/intersectional-justice-on-intimate-partner-violence-in-queer-communities/

You can read more from Reina Gattuso from the series on intimate partner violence here: http://feministing.com/author/reinagattuso/

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Infertility and Intimate Partner Violence

Thursday, April 16, 2015

How Fertility Issues Can Impact LGBTQ Relationships

Family planning is an exciting time.  But it also introduces new variables that can add strain and shift power dynamics to any relationship, for both LGBTQ couples and opposite sex couples.

Huffington Post recently featured an interview by  that explores how challenges around conceiving can destabilize a relationship and can morph into intimate partner violence. In the interview, Dr. Linda Ellison, who specializes in helping couples with infertility problems through her practice “Love Creates Life Fertility” based in New York City, explains how infertility can impact a relationship:

Experiencing infertility can bring about a more gentle and compassionate interaction between partners. Yet, as time passes, anxiety and resentment often builds. There is a shift in the dynamic of the couple. The foundation of a relationship is unsettled for a variety of reasons. For instance, one person is medically absolved and the other is labeled the “problem.” There is a difference of opinion about how much time and money should be invested in overcoming infertility, and sex becomes a chore instead of an intimate connecting experience. These strains introduce emotional distance into the dynamic of the couple and can escalate into psychological abuse.

Dr. Ellison goes on to touch about the unique but similar challenges LGBTQ couples face in the struggle with infertility:

A couple is a couple. The make up of a couple — two women, two men, or a woman and a man — doesn’t mean that people in relationships don’t face common sets of challenges. Relating to another person is tricky and involves a lot of compassion for our partner and ourselves. That said, LGBT couples have some unique challenges with fertility…they still face financial questions, they need to agree on an egg donor, a surrogate and they have to decide who is going to be the biological [parent]. Those are all high stakes issues…finances come into play, and economic imbalance is a difficult dynamic that can turn emotionally abusive. Everyone is capable of crushing someone with words. Sexual orientation doesn’t make that more or less likely, and certainly any less damaging when it happens. However, sexual identity definitely introduces more layers into the fertility conversation.

Read more about: “The Intersection of I and Intimate Partner Violence” – an interview between Pierre R. Berastaín and Dr. Linda Ellison.

Are you in an LGBTQ relationship and exploring family planning options?  If so, consider checking out the Rainbow Community Center’s new group GaybyBOOM, an information series for LGBTQ people interested in starting or building a family. Each meeting is a potluck with presentations on different topics and methods of starting a family.

If you have concerns about intimate partner violence in your relationship, please contact our Domestic Violence Liaison, Gillian Silver, at DVadvocate@rainbowcc.org or call 925-692-0090 x343. Gillian is available to speak with you about your relationship and your feelings in a caring, non judgemental, and supportive setting that is culturally sensitive to the unique needs of LGBTQ individuals.

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Women’s Movie Night

Monday, March 16, 2015

Exploring Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in lesbian relationships

Meet other LBTQ Women in at our monthly Women’s Movie Night! Bring some popcorn and your other favorite snacks and watch and discuss movies themes. On March 18 from 7pm-9pm, we will be screening:

My Girlfriend Did It
This documentary, produced by Casa de Esperanza, explores Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in lesbian relationships by highlighting the struggles and resilience of women who share the impact of violence in their lives.

This movie screening is hosted by STAND in Pride, a collaboration between STAND! For Families Free of Violence and the Rainbow Community Center that provides support and services for LGBTQ survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. If you have any questions, contact Layel at layel@rainbowcc.org.

You can learn more about STAND in Pride here: http://rainbowcc.org/program/standinpride/

——————————————————

Healthy Relationship Rights

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Ten signs of a Healthy Relationship

LoveIsRespect.org offers lots of good information about healthy relationships, warning signs of unhealthy or abusive relationships, and content for LGBT youth. The following content comes from LoveIsRespect.org.

Healthy relationships all look different. What they have in common is being based on equality and respect. A healthy relationship is a healthy relationship regardless of your sexual orientation or gender identity. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning and queer (LGBTQ) people have healthy relationships at similar rates and in much the same way as straight couples.

Some signs of a healthy relationship include:

  • Respects your chosen gender pronouns or name.
  • Respects your boundaries.
  • Gives you space to hang out with friends and family without thinking you’re cheating.
  • Doesn’t take your money or tell you what to buy.
  • Never threatens to out you to people.
  • Never invalidates your identity or tells you you’re not a real lesbian, gay man, trans* person or whatever you identify as
  • Your partner respects you and your individuality.
  • Your partner supports you and your choices even when they disagree with you.
  • You can communicate your feelings without being afraid of negative consequences.
  • Both of you feel safe being open and honest.

If you’re wondering if your relationship is healthy, take this relationship quiz to see!

Did you know that you have rights in your relationship? Everyone does, and those rights can help you set boundaries that should be respected by both partners in a healthy relationship. So, what are your rights?

  • You have the right to privacy, both online and off
  • You have the right to feel safe and respected
  • You have the right to decide who you want to date or not date
  • You have the right to choose when/if you have sex and who you have sex with
  • You have the right to say no at any time (to sex, to drugs/alcohol, to a relationship), even if you’ve said yes before
  • You have the right to hang out with your friends and family and do things you enjoy, without your partner getting jealous or controlling
  • You have the right to end a relationship that isn’t right or healthy for you
  • You have the right to live free from violence and abuse

***This content comes from LoveIsRespect.org, the ultimate resource to engage, educate and empower youth and young adults to prevent and end abusive relationships.

If you have concerns about how healthy your relationship is or if you feel that your relationship rights are not being respected, please feel free to contact our Domestic Violence Liaison, Gillian Silver, at DVadvocate@rainbowcc.org or call 925-692-0090 x343. Gillian is available to speak with you about your relationship and your feelings in a caring, non judgemental, and supportive setting that is culturally sensitive to the unique needs of LGBTQ individuals.

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Intimate Partner Violence Mythbusting

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Get to know the facts vs myth when it comes to LGBTQIA Intimate Partner Violence

Explore some common misconceptions about LGBTQIA Intimate Partner Violence and find out the truth about violence by clicking through the drop down menus below.

***This content comes from Tahoe Safe Alliance, an agency that works to end the incidence and trauma of
intimate partner/domestic 
violence, sexual violence, and child abuse in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee.

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Announcing Relationship Skills Class!

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Build Skills for Creating Healthy and Fulfilling Relationships!

Please join us for Relationship Skills Class, a six week class where we will explore our values, goals and dreams for ourselves and our relationships and build skills necessary to have the kinds of relationships that we desire.  Each week we will have group discussions and do individual work to learn about a different topic and strengthen skills related to that topic. You are welcome to drop in on classes or attend all six sessions.  Individuals and people in relationships with each other are welcome in this class, though please keep in mind that everyone will work as an individual.  This class is open to LGBTQ community members and allies ages 18+ and will be held at the Rainbow Community Center on Wednesday evenings, January 14th to February 18th, from 6:30-8:30pm.

Jan 14: Anti-Oppression and Values
Jan 21: Expectations & Negotiation
Jan 28: Accountability
Feb 4: Boundaries
Feb 11: Conflict
Feb 18: Community Connections

This class is a great time to build on and strengthen skills that are important to healthy relationships. If you have concerns about safety in your relationship, or would like additional support outside of the class, please feel free to contact our Domestic Violence Liaison, Gillian Silver, at DVadvocate@rainbowcc.org or call 925-692-0090 x343

Relationship Skill Class is based on curriculum by Northwest Network, and is hosted by STAND in Pride, a collaboration between STAND! For Families Free of Violence and the Rainbow Community Center that provides support and services for LGBTQ survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. You can find more information about STAND in Pride here: http://rainbowcc.org/program/standinpride/

————————————————————————————————————

LGBTQ Domestic Violence Fact Sheet

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Recognizing LGBTQ Intimate Partner Violence as a Public Health Problem

Check out this excellent fact sheet on LGBTQ Intimate Partner Violence/Domestic Violence produced by the Center for American Progress.  The fact sheet discusses: frequency of occurrence of intimate partner violence in LGBTQ relationships, similarities between violence experienced in heterosexual and LGBTQ relationships, additional challenges LGBTQ survivors of intimate partner violence face, and obstacles to accessing LGBTQ culturally competent services. Most notably, it acknowledges that this sort of violence is a public health concern that needs more visibility and advocacy.

Click here to read this important fact sheet: http://www.scribd.com/doc/57833573/Domestic-Violence-in-the-LGBT-Community

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

Welcoming our New STAND in PRIDE Advocate

Monday, November 17, 2014

A New Face raising awareness about LGBTQ Violence

Gillian pic Gillian is very excited to be partnering with the Rainbow Community Center as the STAND in PRIDE Domestic Violence Liaison. Gillian is a staff member of STAND! for Families Free of Violence and is available to connect the RCC community with the services that STAND! has to offer. They are excited to support individual survivors through case management and advocacy while working with the larger LGBTQ community to raise awareness of intimate partner violence.Gillian has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Community Studies from UC Santa Cruz and has worked in the field of sexual health education. One challenge that they saw in health education was that people were not equipped to practice safer sex if their relationships were not healthy, so they decided to dedicate more time to learning about healthy relationships and intimate partner violence.In this role, Gillian hopes to bring more queer and trans* visibility to domestic violence movements so that queer and trans* survivors receive compassionate and competent support. They hope to help people in the community understand the dynamics of violence, recognize signs of abuse, and support survivors.Gillian envisions a world where everyone feels safe and empowered in their relationships, and where communities have the resources to support survivors if they are experiencing abuse.When Gillian is not working with communities to promote healthier relationships, they may be outside taking in some of the East Bay’s beauty, or cooking and crafting with friends.

Gillian Silver

(925) 949-6673
DVadvocate@rainbowcc.org

*gender neutral pronouns that replace he/she, and him/her.

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

STAND in PRIDE Information Video

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Trigger Warning: The following video displays statistics on LGBTQ violence  and real quotes from survivors, and may be triggering to people who have experienced violence.

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC) and STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violence and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

——————————————————

National Trans* Anti-Violence Resource

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

FORGE is a national resource that provides support for trans* & gender nonconforming persons, and their and significant others, family, friends, and allies. Among their projects, they feature a number of support services for trans* & gender nonconforming survivors of violence, including an online writing group, resource guides for service providers, and more.

——————————————————

Addressing Campus Sexual Assault using Technology

Friday, August 15, 2014

Numerous new apps offer new intervention and documentation options relating to sexual violence

Adequate awareness and access to support services relating to sexual violence are huge ongoing point of opportunity for many college campuses.  As discussed previously on this blog, many colleges have recently come under fire for insufficiently addressing instances of sexual assault, and for lacking appropriate culturally relevant intervention skills in serving LGBTQ survivors.  While this struggle is ongoing, new safety tools and resources are expanding options.

Recently, numerous new smartphone apps have been released that offer quick and easy connection to local resources, violence tracking and mapping tools, and safety networking solutions.  NPR recently reviewed a handful of these, which you can read more about here: http://www.npr.org/2014/08/13/339888170/smartphone-apps-help-to-battle-campus-sexual-assaults

More is needed to address the larger systemic issue of violence on college campuses, but this appears to be a productive new direction.  I am curious how useful these apps would be in preventing and responding to LGBTQ sexual assault? I imagine the level of cultural competency will vary app to app, but given what I saw in NPR’s review, it seems that many offer neutral enough language to be broadly applicable.  It will be interesting to see how this new market of intervention and prevention tools continues to develop.

——————————————————

Increased Awareness of Anti-Transgender Violence

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Trigger Warning: The following describes and links to recent violence against transgender individuals, and may be triggering to survivors.

In the last month, four shocking incidents of anti-transgender violence have made national headlines.  First, two transgender women were brutally beaten on public transit in Atlanta, GA late May.  Early June, a transgender woman in Louisiana escaped  her captors after months of torture. Mid-June, a Southern California transgender and immigrant rights advocate was mysteriously found dead in the streets.  And most recently, the burnt remains of a transgender woman were found in Florida.  The first incident is being explored as a hate crime, and it remains unclear whether the later three are also being investigated as hate crimes.  My heart goes out to the communities impacted by this violence – it is so sad to see more of our sisters injured and taken from us in hate and anger.

It is clear though that each of these victims are transgender women of color, holding with recently released findings of the “National Report on Hate Violence Against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Communities” that transgender women of color are more likely to be victims of violence compared to white cisgender persons.  In fact, “more than two-thirds (67%) of homicide victims were transgender women of color, yet transgender survivors and victims only represent 13% of total reports to NCAVP.”  This statistic is both astounding and heart breaking.  However, while the frequency of reports might suggest an increase in anti-transgender violence, it is my opinion that the upsurge in reporting of violence involving transgender victims is due to increased media awareness and attention on transgender issues.  For the first time, the world has turned to listen to the plight of transgender individuals across the nation.

Tomorrow, Friday June 27th is Trans*March in San Francisco and this year’s theme is “Our Time is Now.” This theme echoes the changing political landscape as transgender rights issues have been brought to the forefront of the LGBTQ movement, finally capturing the attention of mass media. While the reports of violence are discouraging, it is emboldening that people are listening to our voices, to our struggle.  We must continue to press this attention, and continue to advocate for the whole of the LGBTQ community.

Relish our successes of the year this Pride weekend, and march on to the future.  Please be safe in your Trans*March, Dyke March, and SF Pride Parade Celebration.

STAND in PRIDE offers support and services for LGBTQ survivors of violence. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of violence, please know that help is available. Support is available through STAND in PRIDE, including case management, safety planning, and informal counseling. Please call our Information Line at  925.692.0090 ext.343 to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

Joint Release from TLC, RYSE, & RCC

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Charge Dropped Against Transgender Student, Restorative Justice at Work

Richmond, CA — In a restorative justice move this week, Judge Thomas M. Maddock of the Juvenile Division of Contra Costa County Superior Court affirmed reconciliation in place of charges for transgender student Jewlyes Gutierrez.

A student of Hercules High, Ms. Gutierrez was charged with misdemeanor battery after an altercation between her and several other students was caught on video in November, 2013.

The subject of persistent harassment and intimidation at school, Ms. Gutierrez had sought intervention and support from Hercules High staff with no success prior to the altercation.

Transgender Law Center partnered with local organizations, including RYSE Youth Center (RYSE) and Rainbow Community Center, to rally community support in response to the charge against Ms. Gutierrez, recognizing the critical opportunity to partner with the District Attorney’s Office, West Contra Costa Unified School District, the individual students, and the broader community in a restorative, healing, and community-building process. As a result, Gutierrez entered an agreement with the court to have her case reevaluated upon the completion of a restorative justice program conducted by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD).

After reviewing the case on May 1, 2014, Judge Thomas M. Maddock dropped the charge in recognition of Gutierrez’s successful completion of the restorative justice program.

With a federal mandate looming over West Contra Costa Unified School District to address a severe and pervasive culture of unchecked harassment and bullying, a dropped charge in favor of a restorative process offers a concrete and effective approach that can be applied district wide.

Organizations such as the RYSE and Rainbow Community Center, where Gutierrez received services and support, employ and advocate restorative justice practices precisely for the results produced in this case – which facilitate individual and community healing and accountability, and work to protect young people of color, who have the highest inequitable rates of contact, from entry and engagement in the juvenile justice system.

Transgender Law Center, RYSE, and Rainbow Community Center are grateful for the willingness and efforts of the students and participating stakeholders to engage in a restorative process and come to peaceful resolution.

Transgender Law Center works to change law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression.

RYSE Youth Center creates safe spaces grounded in social justice that build youth power for young people to love, learn, educate, heal, and transform lives and communities.

Rainbow Community Center of Contra Costa County builds community and promotes well-being among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning (LGBTQ) people and our allies.

Contact:

Mark Snyder, Senior Manager, Communications, Transgender Law Center
mark@transgenderlawcenter.org / 617.416.0552

Kanwarpal Dhaliwal, Community Health Director, RYSE Youth Center
Kanwarpal@ryse.org / 510.579.1922

Ben Barr, Executive Director, Rainbow Community Center
ben@rainbowcc.org / 925.692.0090

——————————————————

White House Addresses Sexual Assault on College Campuses

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Fails to address the needs of LGBTQ Students

Yesterday, on Tuesday April 29, 2014, the White House released the second video in a PSA series dubbed “1 is 2 Many,” this time targeting the issue of sexual violence on college campus.  In many ways, this PSA raises important points in its call to action.  The video does a great job of emphasizing the need for consent, calling out victim blaming as a problem, and implores the ethical responsibility for bystander intervention.  The video features President Obama, Vice President Biden, Daniel Craig, Benicio Del Toro, Dulé Hill, Seth Meyers, and Steve Carell together calling men to action to address the ominous issue of sexual violence that affects women.

However, as this article points out, the PSA falls a bit short in that it “utterly neglect(ed) male victims of sexual assault and violence — a sorely missed opportunity for meaningful inclusion of a group too often left out of these discussions.  (The campaign’s website states, “While men compromise a smaller number of survivors, male survivors are no less important.”)”  Here at STAND in PRIDE, I would take that argument further in calling out another vulnerable demographic that has been left out of this video – lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer survivors of sexual assault.

In the PSA, the ask is being made of men by men, in reference to the women of import in their lives – IE, heterosexual people only.  What of gay male survivors?  What about violence between two female lesbians?  This PSA does not acknowledge their experience, nor does it give the public the tools necessary to be able to help support them.   Within 24-hrs, two other articles have come out calling out the need to address LGBTQ sexual violence on college campus.

The first article discusses some of the many additional barriers that LGBTQ students, compared to their heterosexual counterparts, face in reporting and seeking help following incidents of violence.  The article notes the risk of being outed  if they report the incident, and that “the reporting process can be unwelcoming to LGBT survivors of sexual assault” in that questions are heteronormative and solicit information only in regards to man-woman encounters. Additionally, the Director of the Genesee Valley chapter of the NYCLU, KaeLyn Rich notes how in the state of New York , “there are no other legal protections for transgender and gender non-conforming people.”

The second article discusses recent charges by students at Columbia and Barnard University filed with the federal Department of Education. In the article, one student suggests “that the university lacks administrators who have the ability and training to treat LGBTQ students sensitively” and as such fails to address instances of violence in a culturally competent fashion and neglects to to give survivors necessary support in the recovery process. It also calls out the failure of the system to support transgender and gender nonconforming persons.

While both of these articles address incidents specific to Nazareth College, and Columbia and Barnard University, I do not think the issues raised for LGBTQ survivors of sexual violence are unique to these campus, to colleges in general, or to New York State.  I think that  institutionalized barriers to access, failure of culturally competent service provisions, and the blatant erasure of the LGBTQ experience are common place and demonstrative of the systematic failure to serve LGBTQ survivors everywhere.  These stories are not new, but I am gladdened that awareness of these issues is spreading as evidenced by the publishing of two relevant articles drawing attention to the needs of LGBTQ survivors within 24 hours of the White House’s PSA.  We also continue to see anti-violence projects like STAND in PRIDE popping up all over the states, and starting to turn the tides of awareness on the issue of LGBTQ sexual violence. These headlines are especially appropriate given that April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, so this media discussion of sexual violence, and the impacts on LGBTQ people could not be more timely.

STAND in PRIDE offers support and services for LGBTQ survivors of teen dating violence and intimate partner violence. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of violence, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through Community Violence Solutions at 800.670.7273, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling is available through STAND in PRIDE. Please call our Information Line at  925.692.0090 ext.343 to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

Statement on Violence Against Transgender & Gender Nonconforming People in Contra Costa County

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Released March 6, 2014 from STAND in PRIDE:

Recent news stories have highlighted violence against two transgender high school students in our county. While questions have arisen around the most recent sexual assault case, we know that these are just examples of the many ways that LGBTQ young people and adults experience rejection and discrimination within our local communities.

The National Coalition of Anti Violence Projects found in 2010 that people who identify as transgender are 28% more likely to experience violence than those who are gender conforming. Further, of the reported hate-motivated murders, almost half were transgender women, even though they represented only 10% of the total reported anti-LGBT violence cases. The National Gay & Lesbian Task Force and National Center for Transgender Equality found in 2011 that more than half of transgender respondents reported being harassed or bullied in school, 61% had experienced physical assault, and 64% had experienced sexual assault.

Not only do transgender and gender nonconforming people face violence within their own families, on their own streets, and where they work or go to school, but they experience rejection and discrimination within the very systems that should protect and serve them.

Healthcare facilities, police departments, and school systems fail transgender people in many ways: they may refuse to recognize the person’s true gender, name, and pronoun usage; they may treat transgender people as objects of curiosity or ridicule instead of citizens in need of support; or they may disproportionately apply penalties such as school suspensions. Transgender victims of violence are too often blamed for the violence they experience, with words that are very familiar to veterans of the domestic violence and sexual assault services: “He shouldn’t dress like that.” “She shouldn’t have walked into that bathroom.” “They shouldn’t have said those words.”  When we blame the victim, we forget that all Contra Costa citizens deserve to live in communities where we feel safe and respected.

In November, the Contra Costa Board of Supervisors recognized Transgender Day of Remembrance, honoring the brave Transgender activists and allies who survive and thrive despite discrimination and violence. We as a county must continue to protect, serve, and support Transgender citizens as a part of our diverse community.

The STAND in PRIDE project is a collaboration between STAND! For Families Free of ViolenceCommunity Violence Solutions, and Rainbow Community Center. Funded by the California Office of Emergency Services, advocates provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violencesexual assault, and hate violence. To find out more, visit our webpage at www.rainbowcc.org/standinpride or call our information line at 925.692.0090 ext.343.  24-hr crisis support is available through Community Violence Solutions at 800.670.7273,

——————————————————

Collaborative Response to Hercules High School Incident

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Joint statement release March 4, 2014 from Gay-Straight Alliance Network, the RYSE CenterTransgender Law Center, and the Rainbow Community Center of Contra Costa County in response to Hercules High School incident:

 In light of recent reports, our hearts continue to go out to the youth and his family. We take very seriously every story about any student not being safe and supported. We understand violence and issues of safety are pervasive problems in West Contra Costa Unified School District, and we share the district’s stated goal of ensuring all students are able to learn and thrive in a safe, compassionate, and welcoming environment. We continue our strong commitment to all students, and our open invitation to partner with the district to create a positive school environment remains

——————————————————

Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

Friday, February 28, 2014

Online Prevention Education raises awareness on Teen Dating Violence

Preventative education is key for preparing young people to identify teen dating violence and unhealthy relationship behaviors.  In recognition of Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, many innovative online education resources have been made available that specifically target teens.  One particularly awesome one is Thats Not Cool, offering a video asking “Where Do you Draw your Digital Line?” This innovative campaign uses multimedia to problematize controlling behaviors in relationships, and highlights  a common form of teen dating violence.  Even more cool, it features a young LGBT couple.  Check out the video below:

Did you know that:

-1 in 3 teens report knowing a peer who has been part of a physically abusive relationship.
-Violent behavior begins as early as 12 years old.
-Children who are exposed to violence are more likely to attempt suicide, abuse drugs and alcohol, run away from home, engage in teenage prostitution, and commit sexual assault crimes.
-Family violence is a multi-generational cycle; children sometimes repeat what is modeled by their family members.
-Boys who witness domestic violence are twice as likely to repeat the abuse as adults.

*Statistics from STAND!

In effort to raise awareness for Teen Dating Violence Month, the youth from the Rainbow Community Center and youth leaders from STAND! for Families Free of Violence got together today to discuss healthy relationships, social stereotypes and pressure.  The conversation was thoughtful and engaging, and folks had an excellent time getting to know each other.  Check out our awesome youth leaders:

IMAG0568

STAND in PRIDE offers support and services for LGBTQ survivors of teen dating violence and intimate partner violence. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of violence, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through STAND! For Families Free of Violence at 888.215.5555, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling is available through STAND in PRIDE. Please call our Information Line at  925.692.0090 ext.343 to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

Contra Costa County Proclamation of National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Contra Costa County’s Board of Supervisors officially proclaimed January as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month 2014

On Tuesday, January 14, 2014, the Board of Supervisors of Contra Costa County declared and recognized National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month.  The text of the proclamation is as follows:

Proclaiming January 2014 as Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

WHEREAS, Human Trafficking is the illegal trade in human beings for the purposes of commercial sexual exploitation or forced labor; a modern-day form of slavery; and

WHEREAS, Human Trafficking is a lucrative industry and the fastest growing criminal industry in the world; Globally, it is tied with the illegal arms trade, as the second largest criminal activity, following the drug trade, and uses violent and exploitive tactics to prey upon vulnerable members of our communities – especially women and children; and

WHEREAS, the crime of Human Trafficking violates an individual’s dignity, security, privacy and humanity due to the systematic use of physical, emotional, sexual, psychological and economic exploitation, control and/or abuse; and

WHEREAS, the impact of Human Trafficking is wide-ranging, directly affecting foreign nationals as well as domestic men, women, children, and society as a whole; and

WHEREAS, it is often the most vulnerable members of our communities who are victimized by Human Trafficking, with perpetrators exploiting that vulnerability for their own needs and gains; targeting an estimated 1.2 million victims nationally each year with over half of those being forced into the sex industry and 98% of those victims being female; and

WHEREAS, the County’s Zero Tolerance for Domestic Violence Initiative acknowledges that fighting modern slavery is a shared community responsibility and therefore has worked with numerous public and private agencies to establish the Zero Tolerance for Human Trafficking Coalition, in order to strengthen the County’s comprehensive response to human trafficking initiated by County Departments, law enforcement agencies, and numerous community and faith-based organizations and continuing to build its collaboration by linking with local, regional and federal agencies; and

WHEREAS, the County works to raise awareness so individuals will become more informed, and will take action to end Human Trafficking in their communities.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Supervisors of Contra Costa County does hereby proclaim January 2014 as SLAVERY AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING PREVENTION MONTH, and urges all residents to actively participate in the efforts to both raise awareness of and end all forms of human trafficking in our communities.

A video of the Board of Supervisor’s proclamation of National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month and the following resolution is available here: http://www.pbtech.org/clients/CCBOS/agenda/cccbos01142014.html

In contribution to County-wide efforts to raise awareness as part of National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, Contra Costa Crisis Center has released a new Quick Resource Guide detailing services and resources for survivors of human trafficking in Contra Costa County.  The Quick Resource Guide in available in English or Spanish here.  Contra Costa Crisis Center has numerous other useful resource guides on its website, www.211database.org.

To raise community awareness on this issue, the office of District Attorney Mark Peterson is launching a poster campaign featuring the image below.  Over the next month, this campaign will be visible all over Contra Costa on billboards, at BART stations, and on bus shelters to further awareness raising efforts on Human Trafficking.

Human Trafficking in Contra Costa is Real!

National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month has received national recognition through Barack Obama’s Presidential proclamation. You can read the full text of this proclamation here: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/12/31/presidential-proclamation-national-slavery-and-human-trafficking-prevent

STAND in PRIDE strives to educate the community about how LGBTQ people are affected by violence. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of violence, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through Community Violence Solutions at 800.670.7273, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling is available through STAND in PRIDE. Please call our Information Line at  925.692.0090 ext.343 to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Contra Costa County recognizes National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month 2014

This month, STAND in PRIDE recognizes National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month.  This presents an opportunity to render the reality of this abuse visible. Shocking as it may seem, human trafficking especially impacts the LGBTQ community through the commercial sexual exploitation of LGBTQ minors.  Unfortunately, due to high levels of homelessness and abuse, LGBTQ youth are sometimes forced into sex work.

Many times the LGBT youth’s entry into commercial sexual exploitation begins with survival sex or the exchange of sexual favors for basic needs like food, shelter or clothing. A study in Canada found that youth who identify as LGBT were three times as likely to engage in survival sex than their heterosexual peers.

To learn more about the risk & impact of trafficking on LGBTQ youth, check this out: http://humantraffickingsearch.net/wp/sex-trafficking-of-lgbt-youth/

STAND in PRIDE works year round to provide services to local survivors of sexual violence and domestic/intimate partner violence. STAND in PRIDE recognizes that this type of violence often co-occurs as part of sexual exploitation and trafficking. We are working everyday to begin dialogue exposing the specific challenges that LGBTQ survivors of violence face. Through this dialogue, we hope to effect change in our community and make it known that help is available!

If you or someone you know is being sexually exploited, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through Community Violence Solutions at 800.670.7273, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling in available through STAND in PRIDE. Please contact our Sexual Assault AdvocateMeredith Webb, at 510.815.4528 or SAadvocate@rainbowcc.org to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

Transgender Day of Remembrance 2013

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

STAND in PRIDE and the Rainbow Community Center recognize International Transgender Day of Remembrance 2013

On Tuesday, November 5, 2013, history was made in Contra Costa County.  On this date, staff members from the Rainbow Community Center of Contra Costa County and the STAND in PRIDE Collaborative, and beloved members of our community, joined the Board of Supervisors of Contra Costa County as they declared and recognized Wednesday, November 20, 2013 as International Transgender Day of Remembrance 2013.  Two brave community members spoke at this symbolic event, expressing the importance of recognizing this day and our gratitude for the visibility rendered to the struggle that the transgender community faces.

The text of the proclamation is as follows:

In the matter of declaring November 20, 2013 as “International Transgender Day of Remembrance” in Contra Costa County.

WHEREAS, those in society who are perceived to transgress gender norms, regardless of their self-identity or gender expression, are at risk for violence out of proportion to their numbers; and

WHEREAS, while many of these transgender individuals live safe, healthy, and fulfilling lives, others have had their lives cut short by violence based on hatred and prejudice, affecting victims, their families, and their communities; and

WHEREAS, gender noncomforming people in Contra Costa County deserve to live free of the threat of oppression, prejudice, and violence; and

WHEREAS, many Contra Costa groups and individuals are doing commendable work to support transgender victims of violence and to prevent violence, including the STAND in PRIDE collaborative of Community Violence Solutions, STAND! for Families Free of Violence, and Rainbow Community Center; and

WHEREAS,the Contra Costa LGBTQQI2-S Inclusion Initiative is helping to promote cultural competence in serving transgender clients and patients; and

WHEREAS, County service providers in behavioral health, medical services, and social services who provide respectful treatment to transgender clients should be celebrated and serve as role models; and

WHEREAS, many transgender and gender variant people and activists show bravery and strength, particularly those working within intersections of identity and oppression, demonstrating the spirit of survival in advocating and creating friendly and welcoming spaces for themselves across Contra Costa County – including but not limited to: Diablo Valley Girls, the Brown Boi Project, Gender Spectrum, Contra Costa Health Services, RYSE, Neighborhood House of North Richmond, Planned Parenthood Shasta-Pacific, Rainbow Community Center’s Transgender Support Group and Gender Voice Support Group, among others; and

WHEREAS, “International Transgender Day of Remembrance” provides a meaningful opportunity to honor transgender people, including those who are victims of violence, to take a stand against intolerable and unacceptable hatred and prejudice, and to acknowledge the many dedicated Contra Costa individuals and groups working to support the transgender community.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Supervisors of Contra Costa County acknowledges the County’s transgender and gender nonconforming youth, seniors, residents, and employees as valued and respected members of our community, and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Board of Supervisors of Contra Costa County, for the first time, declares the day of November 20, 2013 as “International Transgender Day of Remembrance” and encourages a save and accepting environment for all members of the community in Contra Costa, with special attention to our transgender and gender nonconforming communities.

PASSED by a unanimous vote of the Board of Supervisors members present this 5th day of November 2013.

Please check out the following photo stream to see more pictures from this historic event: http://www.flickr.com/photos/johngioia2013/sets/72157637352238404/

In the past month, our community has been witness to three acts of violence against the transgender community.  The first of which took place in Oakland, where a nonbinary identified person was set on fire aboard an AC Transit bus.  Days later, a twenty five year old transwoman took her own life in Walnut Creek.  Most recently, a young transgender girl at Hercules High School got in to a fight following harrassment by other students.  In response to this upsurge in violence, the Rainbow Community Center authored the following article calling for community to remember victims of gender violence: http://www.contracostatimes.com/opinion/ci_24526112/call-community-remember-victims-gender-violence?source=rss

Today, STAND in PRIDE and the Rainbow Community Center of Contra Costa County recognizes International Transgender Day of Remembrance.  Today, we remember all the lives that have been lost to anti-transgender hate in the past year – and through this, hope to raise awareness of hate violence against transgender people.

 (If the video does not play, please click here.)

Today we honor the lives of our brothers and sisters who have been taken from us through violence. This year, the lives of 238 transgender people were lost due to transphobia – and this number likely falls grievously short, as much of the violence against transgender people goes unreported and unsolved.  All too often, violence against transgender people persists even beyond death, as reports of violence often misgender and fail to acknowledge the gender and identity that people lived as. Through this systematic erasure, recognition of the true scope of violence against transgender people continues to be lost. This violence must end.

Please stop by the center this week and visit our memorial table, dedicated to those who have been killed this past year. Feel free to leave a few words to the departed in our guestbook, along with any other mementos or tokens.

IMG_0404

If you are unable to join us, please take a moment to review this online memorial, put together by TransgenderDoR.org.  For more information about Transgender Day of Remembrance, please check out: http://www.transgenderdor.org.

STAND in PRIDE strives to educate the community about how LGBTQ people are affected by violence. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of hate violence, please refer them to STAND in PRIDE’s online hate documentation platform. For more information about STAND in PRIDE services, please call 925.692.0090 ext.343.

Are you interested in learning how you can help put an end to the violence and become a trans* ally?  Check out these awesome tip sheets!

how to be a trans ally

How to be a Transgender Ally:
http://theuntitledmag.tumblr.com/post/31065985070/image-description-colorful-poster-on-how-to-be-a

transphobicwords

Words That Are Transphobic and Why:
http://www.bilerico.com/2011/11/words_that_are_transphobic_why.php


trans-poster-900
What does the Asterisk* Stand for?
http://itspronouncedmetrosexual.com/2012/05/what-does-the-asterisk-in-trans-stand-for/

New Trans Umbrella V3 The Transgender Umbrella:
http://transstudent.org/transumbrella

 

In addition to STAND in PRIDE, the Rainbow Community Center also offers two social support groups for transgender and gender nonconforming people: Gender Voice and the Transgender Group.

——————————————————

Obama Recognizes October as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Thursday, October 22, 2013

Obama recognizes “LGBT” survivors in his Presidential Proclamation

In his Presidential Proclamation recognizing October as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month 2013, Obama thoroughly and succinctly addresses the various facets of the issue of domestic violence nationally.  Firstly, he recognizes the successes made in domestic violence advocacy work over the last twenty years, specifically noting improved services for survivors and improved social awareness. He goes on to acknowledge that continued work is needed, noting that “one in four women and one in seven men in the United States still suffer serious physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner at least once during their lifetimes.”

Obama also notes the additional provisions incorporated into the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), including the increased protections for LGBTQ survivors.  I was particularly touched to see that the president’s proclamation noted the fact that intimate partner violence affects LGBTQ people, as we so often go unrecognized, even in the larger body of domestic violence advocacy work. You can read more about the reauthorization of the VAWA to learn more about the added protections for LGBTQ people.

You can read the full text of Obama’s Presidential Proclamation here:  http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/09/30/presidential-proclamation-national-domestic-violence-awareness-month-201

STAND in PRIDE strives to educate the community about how LGBTQ people are affected by domestic and intimate partner violence. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of intimate partner violence, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through STAND! For Families Free of Violence at 888.215.5555, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling is available through STAND in PRIDE. Please call our Information Line at  925.692.0090 ext.343 to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

53 Survivors of Sexual Assault Quote the People who Attacked Them

Monday, September 30, 2013

Trigger Warning: The following articles display real quotes from attackers of sexual assault survivors and may be triggering to people who have experienced sexual violence.

In October of 2011, Grace Brown founded Project Unbreakable, a project that aims to “increase awareness of the issues surrounding sexual assault and encourage the act of healing through art.”  Since then, the project has displayed over two thousand submissions from survivors of sexual assault holding signs with quotes of what their rapist said before, during, or after their assault.

In September of 2013, BuzzFeed posted a selection of 53 images from Project Unbreakable – 27 quotes from female survivors of sexual assault, and another 26 who identify as male.  The wide representation of people in the photos illustrates that the crime of sexual assault is a human issue, and that it affects people regardless of race, gender, or sexual orientation.

I feel grateful for the inclusion of LGBTQ persons in BuzzFeed’s selection.  Sexual assault is already so often shrouded in silence, so much so that sometime we don’t even hear about male survivors and LGBTQ survivors of sexual violence.   And this is all the more shame inducing.  The inclusion of men and LGBTQ people in this campaign felt intentional – a deliberate acknowledgement of the stories of our community that are not often recognized.

Learn more about Project Unbreakable: http://projectunbreakable.tumblr.com/
27 Survivors Of Sexual Assault Quoting The People Who Attacked Them: http://www.buzzfeed.com/regajha/27-survivors-of-sexual-assault-quoting-the-people-who-attack
26 Male Survivors Of Sexual Assault Quoting The People Who Attacked Them: http://www.buzzfeed.com/spenceralthouse/male-survivors-of-sexual-assault-quoting-the-people-who-a

STAND in PRIDE strives to educate the community about how LGBTQ people are affected by sexual violence. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of sexual violence, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through Community Violence Solutions at 800.670.7273, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling is available through STAND in PRIDE. Please contact our Sexual Assault AdvocateMeredith Webb, at 510.815.4528 or SAadvocate@rainbowcc.org to learn how we can help.


——————————————————

Violence Against Women Act Reauthorized!

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

House Passes the Violence Against Women Act with Expanded LGBTQ Protections!

Finally, as of March 7, President Obama has signed the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) back into law! The Act has been reauthorized with additional protections for many underserved populations for the next five years! Check out our last post about the VAWA, and the struggle to pass it in the House.

These additional provisions give greater protection to Native Americans, immigrants, and LGBTQ persons. The additions include giving greater jurisdiction to tribal courts to prosecute non-Native Americans who assault Native Americans or commit assault on reservations. They also include an expanded definition of crimes covered by the U visa, a temporary visa for immigrants who are survivors of violence who wish to come to the US to escape continued violence.

The reauthorization of VAWA also includes protections for LGBTQ people that bars service providers from discriminating against people due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. This means that LGBTQ people are protected from being turned away from shelters or other necessary services due to their actual or perceived identity.

Check out this Myth/Fact comparison:

Myth: Domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking and dating violence does not affect the LGBTQ community.

Fact: The LGBTQ community experiences these types of violence as the approximately the same rate as non-LGBTQ victims– 25-33% of relationships — however, they often face unique barriers to receiving services.

  • LGBT victims are denied services. For example, 45 percent of LGBT victims were turned away when they sought help from a domestic violence shelter, according to a 2010 survey, and nearly 55 percent of those who sought protection orders were denied them.2
  • Service providers lack cultural competency. A 2010 study found that many victim services providers lack services specific to the needs of LGBT victims and have not received training in how to assist with the unique needs of these victims. Specialized services are particularly important for this population because reporting rates and prosecution rates are very low.

Read more: http://4vawa.org/pages/lgbtq-provisions-of-s-1925-myths-vs-facts

Want to learn more about the LGBTQ provisions in the recent reauthorization of the VAWA? Check out this Fact Sheet!

These added protections are a big deal for our community! While LGBTQ people can certainly find culturally competent and nonjudgemental services with us at STAND in PRIDE, our community members should never be turned away or have their experience invalidated by other service providers! We hope that these new provisions will encourage agencies like ours to put greater effort into meeting the needs of various underserved populations in a holistic and heartfelt fashion.

——————————————————

Layers of Identity: A Queer Survivor Recovering from an Eating Disorder

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

How a Queer Identity Complicates and Interacts with Being a Survivor and One’s Relationship with Hir Body

In the following article, a queer survivor of domestic violence who has also struggled with anorexia, talks about how these multiple experiences and identities interact and influence hir* perspectives and experiences in life. The author notes how experiencing domestic violence influenced hir eating disorder and relationship with hir body due to the verbal abuse that focused on how ze* looked. Later, ze wonders whether if it is hir eating disorder or hir gender identity that fuels hir body dysphoria and the desire to be thin and androgynous. Trigger Warning: The following article discusses body image and may be triggering to people who have experience with an eating disorder.

Well, being queer complicates everything, in my experience. It’s tough because everything is so interlaced that I can never really figure out if some things are due to my eating disorder, or my experiences with domestic violence, or my queer identity or any number of things I have experienced in my life…

…It’s all so intertwined that I can’t find where one begins and another ends. And that, I think is the way all of our lives are. Our experiences make us who we are, and are constantly influencing the way we think and relate to the world.

Read more: http://community.feministing.com/2011/03/16/queering-eating-disorders-notes-from-a-complicated-identity/

Issues with food and body image issues often come up among domestic violence and sexual assault survivors. And being queer adds another layer to these experiences. STAND in PRIDE strives to acknowledge the various and complex experiences of survivors and to provide quality support and resources that they deserve. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of violence, please know that help is available.

*gender neutral pronouns that replace he/she, and him/her.

——————————————————

Pitfalls with Modern Framings of Sexual Violence

Friday, February 22, 2013

How an Oversimplified Approach to Sexual Violence Excludes Some LGBTQ Survivors

Sexual violence is a serious social issue that is acknowledged to be very gendered – namely, victims of sexual violence are often women, and men are often the perpetrators. However, this framework of thought oversimplifies the issue of sexual violence, and excludes survivors that are in need of support. The following article discusses the dangers of a gender essentialist approach and calls for more inclusive approaches to sexual violence work.

There’s a ton of problems with this set up, not the least of which is painting women broadly as victims and men as perpetrators. Another way gendered violence functions is by erasing the many people whose experiences of sexual violence don’t fit this model – survivors who are men (cis or trans), trans women, genderqueer, two spirit, or in some other way gender non-conforming, intersex folks, and survivors of crimes perpetrated by atypical attackers, like survivors of queer relationship violence. Sadly, feminists end up perpetuating this exclusion when we talk about victims only as women and perpetrators only as men.

Read more: http://feministing.com/2013/01/31/the-dangers-of-a-gender-essentialist-approach-to-sexual-violence/

When sexual violence is framed as a crime perpetrated by men against women, it is framed as a crime that happens between heterosexual people and the experience of sexual violence between same-gender loving people goes unseen. The unfortunate reality is that sexual violence does happen in same-gender relationships – gay men and transgender people are victims of sexual violence, and sometimes the crime is perpetrated by women. Sexual violence is not limited by gender or sexual orientation, and everyone who is affected by it deserves support, resources, and to have their experience acknowledged.

STAND in PRIDE strives to educate the community about how LGBTQ people are affected by sexual violence. And we acknowledge the experiences of all survivors and honor them in offering the quality support and resources that they deserve. If you or someone you know is an LGBTQ survivor of sexual violence, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through Community Violence Solutions at 800.670.7273, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling is available through STAND in PRIDE. Please contact our Sexual Assault Advocate, Meredith Webb, at 510.815.4528 or SAadvocate@rainbowcc.org to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

Disparity in Services for LGBTQ Trafficked Youth

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

editted: January 25th, 2013

National Efforts to Raise Awareness about the Unique Challenges of LGBTQ Survivors of Human Trafficking

A service provider to trafficked youth speaks up about the inequality of services between girls and boys, and notes unique challenges for LGBTQ survivors of trafficking. Like STAND in PRIDE, organizations across the nation like Courtney’s House are working to address the specific needs of sexually exploited LGBTQ youth.

I’d like to take a moment to point out a troubling gap in services for gay and transgender youth who have been commercially sexually exploited.

Read more: http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/speaking-out/2012/jun/27/calling-gay-community-support-youth-services/#ixzz2ICP8Fu8P

Follow us: @wtcommunities on Twitter

If you or someone you know is being sexually exploited, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through Community Violence Solutions at 800.670.7273, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling is available through STAND in PRIDE. Please contact our Sexual Assault Advocate, Meredith Webb, at 510.815.4528 or SAadvocate@rainbowcc.org to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

January Human Trafficking Awareness Month

Friday, January 11th, 2013

editted: January 25th, 2013

STAND in PRIDE recognizes Human Trafficking Awareness Month

The month of January is recognized as Human Trafficking Awareness Month, an opportunity to educate our community about the reality of this abuse in our own community. STAND in PRIDE works year round to provide services to local survivors of sexual violence and domestic/intimate partner violence. We in the STAND in PRIDE collaborative recognize that these kinds of violence often occur as part of sexual exploitation and trafficking. We are working everyday to begin dialogue exposing the specific challenges that LGBTQ survivors of violence face. Through this dialogue, we hope to effect change in our community and make it known that help is available!

To this end, we wanted to share this personal account about a gay survivor of trafficking from Chicago who was kicked out of his house because of his sexuality. His heartbreaking tale reveals the dark reality of this pressing social issue for LGBTQ youth of today. Be warned, the following article discusses sexual exploitation and maybe be triggering to survivors.

Sex trafficking victims are not just teenage girls from rural villages in Thailand. A young American boy is just as vulnerable to sexual slavery as Thai youths. Today, a survivor of gay youth sex trafficking unlocks his past about sexual slavery of the American Lesbian, Gay Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) youth in Chicago.

Read more: http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/rights-so-divine/2012/jun/18/chicago-survivor-gay-sex-trafficking-speaks-about-/#ixzz2IC6WM9dN

Follow us: @wtcommunities on Twitter

If you or someone you know is being sexually exploited, please know that help is available. 24-hr crisis support is available through Community Violence Solutions at 800.670.7273, and on going support like case management, safety planning, and informal counseling in available through STAND in PRIDE. Please contact our Sexual Assault Advocate, Meredith Webb, at 510.815.4528 or SAadvocate@rainbowcc.org to learn how we can help.

——————————————————

Violence Against Women Act Renewal dies in the House

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

House fails to put the Senate-passed version of the Violence Against Women Act to vote

The House failed to bring the Senate’s version of the Violence Against Women Act to vote before it expired with the end of the 112th Congress. This marks the first time that the VAWA has expired since its origin in 1994.

It is unfortunate that VAWA was not brought to the floor for a vote, because it seemed as if opinion has shifted enough that if brought to the floor, it would have likely passed. Senator Patty Murray is already “‘absolutely’ planning to reintroduce the bill in 2013.” Historically, this has been a bill that has received bipartisan support. Hopefully it will pass in the new Congress without controversy. Click here to read more on the expiration of VAWA.

It is currently unknown when the bill will be reintroduced, and what if any impact its expiration will have on the availability of services for domestic/intimate partner violence and sexual assault survivors. Click here to read about one survivor of sexual assault sharing her experience receiving services fund by VAWA and her concerns about the expiration of VAWA.

——————————————————

Violence Against Women Act Renewal struggles to pass in the House

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

GOP Opposition in the House threatens the inclusion of additional LGBTQ protections in the renewal of Violence Against Women Act

This year, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is up for renewal, and thus has been under review in both the House and Senate. The Senate has already passed the reauthorization on their version of the bill, with added provisions to “increase number of visas available to victims of domestic violence who are undocumented immigrants; ban discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender victims of domestic violence and give more authority to Native American tribes to address domestic violence.”

However, the Senate’s version has been met with resistance in the House. Instead, the House has passed a more limited version that does not included added protections for the LGBTQ community. And this reduced proposition will not pass in the Senate, because the Senate favors their more inclusive version of the bill.

Hopefully a resolution will be found soon, because if VAWA dies, state and local governments will have fewer resources to address issues of domestic violence. You can read more on the issue here and here.

VAWA was first passed in 1994, and since then it has been an invaluable piece of legislation that has improved the response of the criminal justice system to issues of violence like domestic violence and sexual assault. For more information on VAWA, please check out this break down and this fact sheet.

——————————————————

“We Can Stop It” Awareness Campaign in Europe

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Gay Vignette included in an European Campaign to end Sexual Abuse!

Check out this awesome Campaign to raise awareness around sexual abuse in Scotland! The “We Can Stop It” campaign notes that there have been recent changes in laws relating to rape that refocuses the definition of rape around “consent.” This Campaign is unique in that it is led by men talking to other men – to take ownership of their actions and make respectful choices with their sexual partners. I love this approach – the framing of together, “We Can Stop It” is a call to arms that gives all parties agency in creating change, and avoids victim-blaming.

What is even cooler is that the ad campaign for “We Can Stop It” features a gay vignette! The ad states,” I listen when a guy says no. Do you?” and is shown third in line in the slide show on their main page! The inclusivity of this campaign is admirable – I would love to see a similar approach led here in the states.

——————————————————

Transgender Day of Remembrance 2012

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Remembering Our Dead…

Today we remember all the lives that have been lost to anti-transgender hate in the past year. STAND in Pride and the Rainbow Community Center of Contra Costa County recognizes November 20th, International Transgender Day of Remembrance, in hopes of raising awareness of hate crimes against transgender people. Please check out our official Transgender Day of Remembrance 2012 Press Release.

(If the video does not play, please click here.)

Today we honor the lives of our brothers and sisters who have been taken from us through violence. There have been over fifty reported deaths this year – and more still that are never reported. Please take a moment to review this online memorial, put together by Ethan St.Pierre at TransgenderDoR.org. This violence must end. STAND in PRIDE is working tirelessly to roll out our newest programming, to provide services to survivors of hate crimes and to raise awareness in the community about this issue, as it applies to the whole of the LGBTQ community.

Please stop by the center this week and visit our memorial table, dedicated to those who have been killed this past year. Feel free to leave a few words to the departed in our guestbook, along with any other mementos or tokens.

For more information about Transgender Day of Remembrance, please check out: http://www.transgenderdor.org and http://www.rememberingourdead.org/about/core.html.

——————————————————

The Gay Mens Domestic Violence Project

Wednesday, November 12th, 2012

Community Spotlight Presents…

Get into the GMDVP – a story of triumph since it was founded by a survivor of domestic abuse! Check out the fun video below!

The Gay Men’s Domestic Violence Project is a grassroots, non-profit organization founded by a gay male survivor of domestic violence and developed through the strength, contributions and participation of the community.

——————————————————

Domestic Violence & HIV Connection?

Monday, June 11th, 2012

What is the connection between these two public health issues?

Check out this very cool (and interactive – even in Power Point) PP presentation from the New York/New Jersey AETC (AIDS Education and Training Centers) and SUNY Stony Brook, Center for Public Health Education about the connection between domestic violence and HIV. The presentation, developed for the Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence in New York State, includes 36 slides and trigger questions for audience response systems.

You can download the presentation for free by going here.

——————————————————

Survivor Stories Extended!

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Ignore the March 8th end date and contact us today! (Edit: We are no longer accepting submissions for Survivor Stories 2012)

 

——————————————————

New Year! New Project!

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Call out for YOUR Stories!

STAND in Pride project is excited to announce our new project: Survivor Stories. We are looking for LGBTQ folks of all ages (youth, adults, seniors) and all backgrounds to share their experiences with interpersonal violence (sexual assault, domestic violence or human trafficking). Confidentiality is extremely important to us – your information will be kept safe. In addition, participants can request as much anonymity as they feel comfortable with. In exchange for your stories, we offer counseling, healing and food. There is a possibility that we may be able to offer other incentives (like travel stipends).

For information, please contact one of the our STAND in PRIDE staff here or send us an e-mail at: saliason@rainbowc.org

——————————————————

Does rape happen to men?

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

Male Rape Victim Shares His Story

Men do not experience rape. Fact or myth? Many times when we think of a survivor of rape it is a woman or child. Someone or something weak and vulnerable. However, there is research that suggest different: The U.S. Justice Department says one in every 10 rape victims is male. Even with that figure, I know there are many survivors who do not step forward to file a claim. This article from www.goqnotes.com tells the story of a young man who experiences rape by another man.

Note: This story contains graphic material that might be upsetting to some readers.

——————————————————

Does War Cause Rape Against Men?

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

Check out this article from the Guardian.co.uk about male survivors of rape.

The rape of men

Sexual violence is one of the most horrific weapons of war, an instrument of terror used against women. Yet huge numbers of men are also victims. In this harrowing report, Will Storr travels to Uganda to meet traumatized survivors, and reveals how male rape is endemic in many of the world’s conflicts…

Want to read more? Click here

——————————————————

STAND in PRIDE Brochures NOW Available!

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

Check out our new brochures!

We offer 3 brochures in a PDF format that can be saved onto your computer. The brochures are double sided. Please check back here often or contact RCC for the most up-to-date version.

–> For a overview of LGBTQQ IPV: STAND IPV Brochure NEW

–> For the LGBTQQ Sexual Assault brochure: CVS Sexual Assault Brochure

–> For the LGBTQQ Human Trafficking brochure: CVS Human Trafficking Brochure

 

——————————————————

What does racism have to do with rape?

Saturday, October 8th, 2011

Often the oppression LGBTQ folks face (like homophobia) keeps society from acknowledging same sex domestic violence and sexual assault as real issues in our communities.

For instance, some police officers don’t know how to respond to a domestic violence call if both partners are of the same sex. I began to wonder how other types of oppression – like racism – allowing sexual assault and rape to happen? What does rape have to do with race and culture? Check out this powerful video below about the painful, yet incredible, story of the village of Senchen in Kenya borrowed from the amazing culturesofresistance.org.

The Rape of the Samburu Women

For more than fifty years, England has maintained military training facilities in the Samburu region of its former colony, Kenya. During this period, women in the area have faced an epidemic of rape. Women from the Samburu, Massai, Rendile and Turkana indigenous communities have filed more than 600 official rape claims against British soldiers. Yet, despite documentation of their claims, a three-year internal investigation by the Royal Military Police (RMP) cleared all soldiers of wrongdoing. Meanwhile, the victims have been shamed and outcast in their communities, many to the point of exile. In the mid-1990s, Beatrice Chili responded to this situation by establishing the village of Senchen, a self-sufficient community run entirely by women. There, women build homes, weave textiles, gather and grow food, and raise children. This short film visits the brave women of Senchen, who speak candidly about their suffering and talk passionately about their demands for justice.

Watch the film to hear their stories and to find out how you can offer your support.

 

Introducing STAND in PRIDE

STAND in PRIDE is a collaboration between the Rainbow Community Center (RCC), STAND! For Families Free of Violence and Community Violence Solutions (CVS).  The goal of the project is to provide support and services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) survivors of domestic violence/intimate partner violencesexual assault, and hate crimes. We also work to educate the community on these issues as they relate to the LGBTQ community by offering educational workshops and informational brochures.

For general information on STAND in PRIDE services, please call: 

 925.692.0090 ext.343

Domestic Violence/Intimate Partner Violence Sexual Assault Report Violence

STAND in PRIDE Blog Community Education and Workshops Resources